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Characterized as Vulnerable

Heart Shaped Tomato

vulnerable-chinese

I sat waiting for my lunch to be ready. Closing my eyes, the sun warming me, honing in on nearby conversations.

“It was just awful!”

“Do you want to meet later?”

“We have to get back soon.”

“What are you hungry for?”

And then, “Think of a Chinese word you’d like to see written.”

Two young women, students conducting a written language experiment, held a small, dry-erase board and the woman in the steel-grey wool skirt looked sheepishly to the man-in-tow standing next to her, scanning his face for a word, for approval.

“Tomato,” she smiled and shrugged.

What an uninteresting word,” I thought to myself. Clearly, hunger and condiments dominated her thoughts to choose such an oddly simple thing.

The student began to draw the two characters, then handed the board to steel-grey skirt and asked her to draw it, to copy the lines in her own hand.

“Like this?” She fumbled through and the student asked to take a picture of steel-grey skirt holding up the sign, which she obliged after being assured it wouldn’t end up on the web or Facebook.

Steel-grey skirt and man-in-tow collected their lunches and wandered off back to their meetings and spreadsheets and before the students could walk away, I volunteered, “I have a word I’d like to see.”

“Great! What’s the word?”

“Vulnerable.”

“Oh—I’ll have to look that one up, it might be kind of difficult, the Chinese don’t really have an expression for that. Well, depending on the context I guess.”

“I suppose weakness is not a good emotional or political stance,” I mused.

She typed it into her phone where there must’ve been a pinyin and symbology translator of sorts and she mumbled, “Ah, hmm, that’s really pretty.”

She sketched out what looked like two number 5s, curved, bent and spooning, little animals with two quick hatchmarks in the coils and crooks, something warm in their bellies perhaps.  The second symbol, like a little house on stick legs, or a bird laying in a field of short reeds or soft, matted grass, or a boat on uneven waves jutting a mast with no sail attached.

She handed me the board and it was my turn to draw.

“Very good!” She encouraged. “You could do calligraphy.”

And I suddenly thought of my high school art class, how I attended my prom for free because I volunteered to hand write every student’s name in my graduating class and their respective date’s name on folded white cardstock for all the seating arrangements at the dinner tables. How I painstakingly wrote every letter with a copper pen tip, sinking the nib into a bottle of crow-black ink, scratching out letters and then with a glue gun, affixing a black bow-tied ribbon and burgundy rose in the corner of every one.

She took my picture holding up the board with “vulnerable” written twice and asked, “Why are you so interested in this word?”
Tomato-HeartI considered the tomato. Heart-shaped, red, plump, viscous inside, thin-skinned, vulnerable and thought perhaps, it wasn’t such a bad word after all and I said, “I think objects are fine, but I am more curious about concepts, especially emotional ones that are difficult to describe with one word. Like love or home or wonder.” I thought about how big ideas cannot, should not easily be boiled down, compartmentalized, or compressed into a single word or worse, an acronym. Americans are really fond of acronyms and especially mnemonics, trying to make big ideas memorable, and easier to digest, when really, what must be done is some digging, some spelunking, some serious unpacking followed by a gentle examination of all the parts.

I thought of other languages where speakers might have cultural differences and difficulties expressing emotion. For instance, one way of responding to the everyday greeting of “How are you?” in Russian is to say ” I am not unwell.” As if, already expressing in the negative was a way of conveying strength. Things could be worse. I’m not dead yet. My friend told a story where in high school, a Russian exchange student staying at his home was being chastised for taking her host family’s young  son out to play in his school clothes on a rainy day. His mother wasn’t at all happy that they had returned so filthy, caked in mud and muck, but the Russian girl sweetly explained to the mother, “he is not unwashable.”

What does it mean to be vulnerable? To be “accessible, assailable, defenseless, exposed, liable, naked, on the line, on the spot, out on a limb, ready, sensitive, sitting duck, sucker, susceptible, tender, thin-skinned, unguarded, unprotected, unsafe, weak, wide open, open to attack.” Why is there no strength in vulnerability when it takes all the courage in the world to allow yourself to let something, some ideas, someone in? To yield with grace to the often terrifying, ever-shifting locus of love, of home, and of wonder.

All three of these ideas have changed greatly for me in the last several years. Losing a beloved pet to cancer, losing a home by being priced out of the neighborhood, losing a job and a marriage; and all of these losses and changes at nearly the same time.  It was like witnessing all the love and home and wonder I nurtured suddenly evaporate out from under me. There was a serious unpacking. There was a gentle examination of all my parts. Especially the ones that went missing, where I identified myself.

I thought of many loves lost in my youth, how some of the most tender pieces of me were carried off by wild wolf boys and buried like edible treasure to devour later. How sometimes there were wounds I ignored and over and over I had to revisit the same old traps that closed upon them to extract myself very carefully so as to not lose more pieces still. Sure, I came out licking my wounds, scathed and dirty. But I emerged whole. 

Turns out, I am not unwahsable. I am not unwell. I am still hungry and I am getting reacquainted with wonder. I have redefined home. I still don’t fully understand the nature of love, but I am very much an eager student and believer of it in all of its necessary function and beautiful, new forms.

And I am still quite vulnerable.

One thought on “Characterized as Vulnerable”

  1. Michael Lewis (aka Edwin Manners) says:

    You are a great writer! I have read this and your “bio” (I will read more asap) and we have a mutual friend in DC in CM at SC. I hope for and desire collaboration that requires organizing, writing, and editing skills. Skills you have! I would like to submit to you some seeds and fruit from MDP (Manners Diary Project).

    “Turns out, I am not unwahsable. I am not unwell. I am still hungry and I am getting reacquainted with wonder. I am redefining home. I still don’t fully understand the nature of love, but I am very much an eager student and believer of it in all of its necessary function and beautiful, new forms.

    And I am still quite vulnerable.” ….

    So clear and concise and deeply wonderful is this non ending ending…. thank you for your magnificent vulnerability! …. here is my first submission to you from MDP: This “new form” from 1899. “One may stand up against the united opinion of the world and be right, but he is generally wrong!

    Happy they in whom the elements are justly mixed and incline them to be good!

    Much as one flies from heaviness and should, for the spirit is light and aspires, the wisdom of the world is its weight. Gravity is its norm. Conservatism, conventions, even a degree of narrowness, the backbone of orthodoxy, custom, law, an everyday understanding,–these steady the course and conduct of life. They regulate and chain to prudence, to reason, the too loose or imperious flight of thought, of action, that not seldom beats ineffectually the void. They conduce to enlightened liberty, to true freedom, and hence majority happiness, in the absence or rarity of seasoned will-direction. Accept what is common in religion and law and the rest. Acceptance may evince more intellect than refusal or the attack destructive. It is greater to build on the better old, and the natural, creative way. For any departure you must certainly master yourself finely and think master-like, or you are apt to run counter to logic and facts and otherwise come to grief. Sometimes, therefore, when I am inclined to scorn people who are slaves to system and cowards of thought, I check myself and say, These too are of service, perhaps of the greatest service, in keeping life sound and sweet. But the air is circumambient, and birds and those who like to breathe its finer heights will fly. ‘Tis their element and joy. For I know that imagination will always be king, and everything, even facts, figures, logic, must melt to meet him and rearise in shapes brighter, more distinct and graceful.” ….

    I hope to hear back from you through e-mail at butterflyparty2012@gmail.com or even better befriend me, Michael Lewis, as Edwin Manners on facebook.
    Thank you and namaste, M

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